persistent stigmatization of this condition despite extensive research demonstrating that it does not discriminate, affecting both smokers and non-smokers, men and women, young and old. It is the second most common type of cancer in non-gender-specific terms and the malignancy with the highest mortality rate. However, scientists have accumulated a large body of evidence indicating that a vast majority of cancers are potentially preventable as they can be linked to identifiable factors. This means that people can lower their risk of developing tumors through lifestyle changes, especially where their diets are concerned. Lending further weight to that claim are the findings of a recent study conducted at Tuft University, says Frank Magliochetti, founder and managing partner of investment banking firm Parcae Capital. Working with mouse and cell models, the research team concluded that a carotenoid pigment compound present mostly in plants could reduce the risk of lung cancer in smokers.

The study was led by Xiang-Dong Wang, senior scientist and head of the Nutrition and Cancer Biology Laboratory at Tuft's Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging. His team explored the effect of a compound called beta-cryptoxanthin (BCX), which gives fruits and vegetables their red, orange or yellow color. The researchers used mice injected with a nicotine-derived carcinogen (NNK), feeding the test group daily doses of BCX before and after administering the cancer-causing substance. Wang was previously involved in a study where the team established a link between the consumption of BCX-rich foods and reduced risk of lung cancer in people. In the latest research project, the focus was on identifying the mechanisms behind that connection in the case of smokers. When the experiment concluded, mice receiving BCX had 50% to 60% fewer tumors on average compared to the rodents in the control group. In a parallel investigation, Wang and his colleagues studied cultured human lung cancer cells treated with different BCX doses and found a significant reduction in their capacity to spread and invade when compared to untreated cells. Nicotine itself does not cause lung cancer, but it binds to a receptor that triggers cell proliferation and blood vessel formation - two key processes in cancer growth. Moreover, nicotine stimulates the production of this receptor. BCX appears to work by reducing its supply on the surface of lung cells, possibly affecting their ability to grow and metastasize.

As Frank Magliochetti notes, more research is needed to improve understanding of how BCX-rich foods could affect lung cancer development in people. Nevertheless, the study findings are highly encouraging and reinforce the belief that dietary choices matter. In comments on the study, Wang pointed out: "For smokers, tobacco product users or individuals at higher risk for tobacco smoke exposure, our results provide experimental evidence that eating foods high in BCX may have a beneficial effect on lung cancer risk, as suggested by previous epidemiological studies. We emphasize that the best way to get BCX is from food, which include other nutrients that can have additive or complementary effects."

An expert in medicine and finance, Frank Magliochetti has launched successful ventures and helped others realize their business dreams. He holds a pharmacy degree from Northeastern University, where he entered the Masters of Toxicology program. Frank went on to specialize in corporate finance, receiving an MBA from The Sawyer School of Business at Suffolk University. In addition to founding several businesses, he has also held senior positions at Baxter International, Kontron Instruments, Haemonetics Corporation, and Sandoz. As part of the team at Massachusetts-based Parcae Capital, Frank provides financial restructuring and interim management services to companies in the healthcare, media, and alternative energy industries.

Frank Magliochetti - Founder and Managing Partner of Parcae Capital: http://frankmagliochettinews.com
Frank Magliochetti - Considers the Use of Augmented Reality in Healthcare: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/frank-magliochetti-considers-augmented-reality-031500962.html
Frank Magliochetti - On the Personal Health Care Spending Trends in the US: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/frank-magliochetti-personal-health-care-165700703.html

Contact Information:

FrankMagliochettiNews.com
contact@frankmagliochettinews.com
http://frankmagliochettinews.com

SOURCE: Frank Magliochetti

ReleaseID: 484379

"/> Frank Magliochetti – Comments on Color Compounds in Foods Lowering Lung Cancer Risk « MarketersMedia – Press Release Distribution Services – News Release Distribution Services
How It Works? Plans & Pricing Our Distributions Newsroom Info Hub Sign Up Sign In Send Press Release Contact Sales
Contact Sales Sign Up Your Account Send Press Release
MarketersMEDIA / Newsroom / Frank Magliochetti – Comments on Color Compounds in Foods Lowering Lung Cancer Risk

Frank Magliochetti – Comments on Color Compounds in Foods Lowering Lung Cancer Risk

Share This Press Release

LAWRENCE, MA / ACCESSWIRE / December 14, 2017 / Lung cancer was long considered a smoker's disease, which is one of the reasons for the persistent stigmatization of this condition despite extensive research demonstrating that it does not discriminate, affecting both smokers and non-smokers, men and women, young and old. It is the second most common type of cancer in non-gender-specific terms and the malignancy with the highest mortality rate. However, scientists have accumulated a large body of evidence indicating that a vast majority of cancers are potentially preventable as they can be linked to identifiable factors. This means that people can lower their risk of developing tumors through lifestyle changes, especially where their diets are concerned. Lending further weight to that claim are the findings of a recent study conducted at Tuft University, says Frank Magliochetti, founder and managing partner of investment banking firm Parcae Capital. Working with mouse and cell models, the research team concluded that a carotenoid pigment compound present mostly in plants could reduce the risk of lung cancer in smokers.

The study was led by Xiang-Dong Wang, senior scientist and head of the Nutrition and Cancer Biology Laboratory at Tuft's Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging. His team explored the effect of a compound called beta-cryptoxanthin (BCX), which gives fruits and vegetables their red, orange or yellow color. The researchers used mice injected with a nicotine-derived carcinogen (NNK), feeding the test group daily doses of BCX before and after administering the cancer-causing substance. Wang was previously involved in a study where the team established a link between the consumption of BCX-rich foods and reduced risk of lung cancer in people. In the latest research project, the focus was on identifying the mechanisms behind that connection in the case of smokers. When the experiment concluded, mice receiving BCX had 50% to 60% fewer tumors on average compared to the rodents in the control group. In a parallel investigation, Wang and his colleagues studied cultured human lung cancer cells treated with different BCX doses and found a significant reduction in their capacity to spread and invade when compared to untreated cells. Nicotine itself does not cause lung cancer, but it binds to a receptor that triggers cell proliferation and blood vessel formation - two key processes in cancer growth. Moreover, nicotine stimulates the production of this receptor. BCX appears to work by reducing its supply on the surface of lung cells, possibly affecting their ability to grow and metastasize.

As Frank Magliochetti notes, more research is needed to improve understanding of how BCX-rich foods could affect lung cancer development in people. Nevertheless, the study findings are highly encouraging and reinforce the belief that dietary choices matter. In comments on the study, Wang pointed out: "For smokers, tobacco product users or individuals at higher risk for tobacco smoke exposure, our results provide experimental evidence that eating foods high in BCX may have a beneficial effect on lung cancer risk, as suggested by previous epidemiological studies. We emphasize that the best way to get BCX is from food, which include other nutrients that can have additive or complementary effects."

An expert in medicine and finance, Frank Magliochetti has launched successful ventures and helped others realize their business dreams. He holds a pharmacy degree from Northeastern University, where he entered the Masters of Toxicology program. Frank went on to specialize in corporate finance, receiving an MBA from The Sawyer School of Business at Suffolk University. In addition to founding several businesses, he has also held senior positions at Baxter International, Kontron Instruments, Haemonetics Corporation, and Sandoz. As part of the team at Massachusetts-based Parcae Capital, Frank provides financial restructuring and interim management services to companies in the healthcare, media, and alternative energy industries.

Frank Magliochetti - Founder and Managing Partner of Parcae Capital: http://frankmagliochettinews.com
Frank Magliochetti - Considers the Use of Augmented Reality in Healthcare: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/frank-magliochetti-considers-augmented-reality-031500962.html
Frank Magliochetti - On the Personal Health Care Spending Trends in the US: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/frank-magliochetti-personal-health-care-165700703.html

Contact Information:

FrankMagliochettiNews.com
contact@frankmagliochettinews.com
http://frankmagliochettinews.com

SOURCE: Frank Magliochetti

ReleaseID: 484379

LAWRENCE, MA / ACCESSWIRE / December 14, 2017 / Lung cancer was long considered a smoker's disease, which is one of the reasons for the persistent stigmatization of this condition despite extensive research demonstrating that it does not discriminate, affecting both smokers and non-smokers, men and women, young and old. It is the second most common type of cancer in non-gender-specific terms and the malignancy with the highest mortality rate. However, scientists have accumulated a large body of evidence indicating that a vast majority of cancers are potentially preventable as they can be linked to identifiable factors. This means that people can lower their risk of developing tumors through lifestyle changes, especially where their diets are concerned. Lending further weight to that claim are the findings of a recent study conducted at Tuft University, says Frank Magliochetti, founder and managing partner of investment banking firm Parcae Capital. Working with mouse and cell models, the research team concluded that a carotenoid pigment compound present mostly in plants could reduce the risk of lung cancer in smokers.

The study was led by Xiang-Dong Wang, senior scientist and head of the Nutrition and Cancer Biology Laboratory at Tuft's Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging. His team explored the effect of a compound called beta-cryptoxanthin (BCX), which gives fruits and vegetables their red, orange or yellow color. The researchers used mice injected with a nicotine-derived carcinogen (NNK), feeding the test group daily doses of BCX before and after administering the cancer-causing substance. Wang was previously involved in a study where the team established a link between the consumption of BCX-rich foods and reduced risk of lung cancer in people. In the latest research project, the focus was on identifying the mechanisms behind that connection in the case of smokers. When the experiment concluded, mice receiving BCX had 50% to 60% fewer tumors on average compared to the rodents in the control group. In a parallel investigation, Wang and his colleagues studied cultured human lung cancer cells treated with different BCX doses and found a significant reduction in their capacity to spread and invade when compared to untreated cells. Nicotine itself does not cause lung cancer, but it binds to a receptor that triggers cell proliferation and blood vessel formation - two key processes in cancer growth. Moreover, nicotine stimulates the production of this receptor. BCX appears to work by reducing its supply on the surface of lung cells, possibly affecting their ability to grow and metastasize.

As Frank Magliochetti notes, more research is needed to improve understanding of how BCX-rich foods could affect lung cancer development in people. Nevertheless, the study findings are highly encouraging and reinforce the belief that dietary choices matter. In comments on the study, Wang pointed out: "For smokers, tobacco product users or individuals at higher risk for tobacco smoke exposure, our results provide experimental evidence that eating foods high in BCX may have a beneficial effect on lung cancer risk, as suggested by previous epidemiological studies. We emphasize that the best way to get BCX is from food, which include other nutrients that can have additive or complementary effects."

An expert in medicine and finance, Frank Magliochetti has launched successful ventures and helped others realize their business dreams. He holds a pharmacy degree from Northeastern University, where he entered the Masters of Toxicology program. Frank went on to specialize in corporate finance, receiving an MBA from The Sawyer School of Business at Suffolk University. In addition to founding several businesses, he has also held senior positions at Baxter International, Kontron Instruments, Haemonetics Corporation, and Sandoz. As part of the team at Massachusetts-based Parcae Capital, Frank provides financial restructuring and interim management services to companies in the healthcare, media, and alternative energy industries.

Frank Magliochetti - Founder and Managing Partner of Parcae Capital: http://frankmagliochettinews.com
Frank Magliochetti - Considers the Use of Augmented Reality in Healthcare: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/frank-magliochetti-considers-augmented-reality-031500962.html
Frank Magliochetti - On the Personal Health Care Spending Trends in the US: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/frank-magliochetti-personal-health-care-165700703.html

Contact Information:

FrankMagliochettiNews.com
contact@frankmagliochettinews.com
http://frankmagliochettinews.com

SOURCE: Frank Magliochetti

ReleaseID: 484379

Source URL: https://marketersmedia.com/frank-magliochetti-comments-on-color-compounds-in-foods-lowering-lung-cancer-risk/278472

Source: AccessWire

Release ID: 278472

Our Client

Subscribe and Recieve exclusive insider tips and tricks on Press Release.

Follow Us

Copyright © 2012 - 2018 MarketersMedia – Press Release Distribution Services – News Release Distribution Services. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by Semantics BigData Analytics (SBDA).